Crypto Cards

European / USA Crypto Debit Cards

Looking for the best deal on crypto bank cards

Debit cards that allow both crypto and fiat currencies to integrate in a usable way that the card holders can transfer funds onto their cards and make payments and purchases at restaurants, cinemas, retail shops, and a host of other places.

We have gathered a list of cards fees to help you Compare the best and worse crypto cards available today



Accounts

Free Trial

Projects

SSL

Storage

Domains

Sub-domains

£5

ONE TIME FEE

UK/USA/EU

Master Card

Buy Virtual Crypto

Virtual Wallet

up to 1% back

Bank/Card

Transfer out to Bank

£1.50

Per Month

UK/USA/EU

Visa Debit

Buy Real Crypto

Wallet included

up to 1.5% Back

Bank/Card/Crypto

500 sub domains

£5

ONE TIME FEE

UK/USA

Visa Debit

Buy Real Crypto

Wallet included

No incentives

Bank/Card/Paypal/Crypto

1000 sub domains


£199

ONE TIME FEE

1000 user accounts

Free 30-day trial

Unlimited projects

SSL encryption

Unlimited Storage

Bank/Card/Paypal/Crypto

Unlimited sub domains

Find the best crypto cards offers available

We have hand picked some of the beat crypto cards available today.

Wirex is another popular option for Europeans. Founded in 2014, the London fintech firm was the first to release a contactless, multi-currency Visa card and boasts over three million customers in 130 countries, having processed $2 billion worth of transactions. Wirex’s slick light-green debit card supports conversion from several major cryptos, has a native built-in utility token (WXT), and gives users 0.5% BTC on in-store purchases through its Cryptoback program, rising to 1.5% if you hold 500,000 WXT tokens. There’s a modest card account maintenance fee of £1.00/€1.20/$1.50, with all other fees and limits broken down here. Having achieved success throughout Europe and the APAC region, Wirex intends to expand into Canada, Japan and the U.S. in 2020.

OPTIONS FUNDING METHODS
NAME TYPE WALLET FEES WIRE CREDIT PAYPAL COUNTRY
Wirex £1.50 PM UK/US/EU
Coinbase £5 one off
Revolut
Crypto Pay
2gether
Adfvcash
AlfaCashier Card
ANXPRO Card
Bitcoin Black
Bitnovo
Bitpay
Bitwala
Bonpay
Change
Coinbase
CoinJar eftpos
Coinsbank
Crpterium eftpos
CryptoPay
Jubier
Lavapay
Loadoo
MCD Visa
Mistertango
Monolith
Nexo
Paycent
Raxcard
Revolut Metal
Satoshi Tango
SpectroCoin
Spend Visa
TenX
Uphold
Uquid
WageCan

While the final choice of Crypto debit card depends on the individual and their particular set of circumstances, there are a number of factors that should be taken into consideration when choosing a card and/or service provider and these include:

Jurisdiction: Due to how the cryptocurrency industry is currently being regulated, each debit card solution will only be available in certain areas. Users need to double check that their region is supported by a debit card provider who also remains regulatory compliant and aims to stay up to date with any changes in legislation.

Ease of Use: Bitcoin debit cards should be easy to use; however, funding options, fees, and spending limits can complicate the experience. Also, as the cards are often attached to online exchange accounts, the ability to easily access your account and/or get in contact with a member of the support team will greatly influence your overall experience. Virtual cards can also help to greatly simplify the spending process.

Security: As ever, with increased security comes greater peace of mind and protocols such as site encryption, two factor authentication, and email/SMS notifications can help to further secure users accounts. Also integration with the major credit card providers enables users to make use of verification protocols such as MasterCard’s 3D Secure.

Reliability: With Bitcoin still only ten years old, the sector is still youthful and it makes sense to try and choose the most established and respected service providers. Cards that are supplied by projects that are fully compliant, transparent, and integrated with the traditional banking system as well as with Visa and MasterCard stand the best chance of surviving in the long run, and to not suddenly disappear or halt their services.

Fees: While the world of digital assets is inherently volatile in nature, Bitcoin debit card users are still motivated to seek the best price rates, and spending on the card shouldn’t be hindered by an overly restrictive fee structure. Projects that maintain transparent and simple fees structures are also well positioned to retain their user base.

Features: Bitcoin debit cards all provide the same core functions of facilitating online/offline spending and allowing card holders to make ATM withdrawals. However, additional features such as alt coin support, banking services, payments/remittance services, and foreign exchange functionality also come in handy.

Incentives: Certain projects focus more on providing a secure and reliable debit card service, while newer projects sometimes aim to attract new users by offering discounts, cashback programs, and referral programs that make their service more attractive.

Plutus is one of the longest running crypto card services, having pitched up in 2015. The London startup has its own loyalty token (PLU) which is awarded to users every time they use their debit card. Notably, though, it’s a noncustodial platform which lets users retain control of their private keys. Usable in almost 200 countries, the card can be topped up using GBP or EUR, with ETH and PLU the only supported cryptos at the current time. Plutus also doubles as a virtual bank account, which is offered to residents anywhere in the European Economic Area (EEA) region for free.

Monolith is a noncustodial option that allows ETH and ethereum-based tokens to be stored in its mobile wallet before being converted and spent on the Monolith Visa card. Billed as a “decentralized bank,” Monolith is closely aligned with the defi movement that has come to define Ethereum. DEX integration will be added soon, together with support for the Ethereum Name Service.

Since 2017, UK digital bank Revolut has let users from the EEA buy, hold and exchange crypto, with the possibility of instantly exchanging any of 30 fiat currencies directly into bitcoin, litecoin, ethereum, bitcoin cash and XRP (and vice-versa). Revolut takes a flat 1.5% cut but it’s possible to transfer crypto to other Revolut members in seconds without paying a fee. Buy goods in-store or online using the Revolut debit card or app; if you only have crypto in your account, Revolut will exchange it into fiat in the retailer’s local currency at the point of purchase. Cryptocurrencies are only available on Revolut’s paid plans: it’s £6.99 a month for a Premium card and £12.99 for a Metal one.

Cryptopay is one of the original bitcoin payment cards, and offers a plastic prepaid card (for ATM withdrawals and offline shopping, $15) and a virtual equivalent (online, $2.50). Available in the U.K., Russia and soon to be available in Singapore, Cryptopay supports only bitcoin alongside fiat currencies GBP, USD and EUR. For a breakdown of the relevant fees for both cards, see here.

It’s fair to say Europe is one of the best regions for those wishing to use crypto-fiat debit cards; in addition to the aforementioned options, there are cards from Bitnovo, Coinbase, Uquid (89 cryptos supported) and 2gether.

North American Crypto Debit Cards

With support for BTC, ETH, XRP, GUSD, USDC, PAX and BCH, Bitpay’s debit card remains one of the best options for U.S. residents. In fact, it’s available to U.S. citizens only. The card costs $9.95 and can be topped up using eight fiat currencies from the Bitpay wallet, then used anywhere that accepts Visa. Bitpay’s currency conversion fee stands at 3% of the transaction, and a $3 charge is due every time you use an ATM outside the U.S. Transaction limits are set at $10,000 a day and you can’t withdraw any more than $1,500 a day or $5,000 a month.

Wirex is planning to launch in the U.S. in the next month, however, meaning that American citizens will soon have another way to exchange their cryptocurrency for fiat.

Global Crypto Debit Cards

Singapore-based financial platform Paycent claims to have onboarded 94,000 customers to its crypto-fiat debit card since it launched in April 2018. While initially supporting only bitcoin, Payment now offers a wide range of cryptos – ETH, BNB, LTC, XRP and DASH included – and represents a global solution, accepted by 36 million merchants in 200 countries. With Paycent cards, you can convert your virtual currency into fiat then spend it online or in physical stores; you can also withdraw cash in the local tender at ATMs throughout the world.

Three Paycent cards are available: Ruby, powered by China Union Pay, has a daily spending/withdrawal limit of $5,000; Sapphire, powered by Union Pay International, has a daily spending limit of $5,600 and a withdrawal limit of $1,650; and Solitaire, powered by Mastercard, carries a daily spending limit of $13,000 and a withdrawal cap of $10,000. Each card costs $49, and while Ruby has no monthly fee, the other two cost $2 per month.

Launched in 2019, Crypterium‘s card lets you spend crypto at over 50 million merchants in 178 countries, as well as withdraw in fiat from 2.5 million ATMs. The physical and virtual card are priced together at $25 and there are no monthly fees unless you jump onto a Plus or Premium plan, where benefits include higher crypto-to-fiat transaction limit, priority support, a savings account, insurance and even a personal manager. Supported cryptos at present are bitcoin, ethereum, litecoin and the native CRPT token, with transaction limits set at $10,000 (daily) and $60,000 (monthly).

Crypto.com’s MCO Visa card (formerly the Monaco Card) is quasi-global, in the sense that it’s available in the U.S., Europe and many countries in APAC. Five different cards are available, with MCO cashback paid in a tiered fashion (1-5%) on every purchase. Up to $120,000 per year can be withdrawn from ATMs with the MCO card, and for holders of the top-tier MCO card up to $1,000 can be withdrawn per month with no fee.

Crypto debit cards make the process of spending digital assets easier. After all, no one wants to jump through hoops selling their bitcoin on an exchange to fund lunch or coffee. If you want to use your tokens for everyday purchases, get yourself a debit card and start spending those satoshis.